Possible Causes for Head Numbness


Head numbness may be a sign of a serious medical condition. It is important to carefully monitor any signs of tingling or numbness of the head, and report them to a doctor to rule out any possibility of serious and life threatening medical problems. There may be many different causes for head numbness to develop.


Head Nerves


The head is supplied by several different nerves. An injury or irritation of these nerves can lead to tingling and numbing sensations of the head. This can mean irritation of the nerves in the spinal cord, the brainstem, or inside of the brain itself. There are many of these nerves; the largest and most commonly affected is the Trigeminal nerve, which divides into the Maxillary nerve, the Ophthalmic nerve and the Mandibular nerve. Each of these branches of the Trigeminal nerve affects different parts of the face. The Cervical nerves supply sensations to the back of the head and brain. Problems associated with these head nerves, which cause head tingling and numbness to occur, are often signs of more serious medical problems.


Possible Causes of Head Numbness


There are many causes of nerve irritation including diseases, metabolic changes, neurological diseases, infections, tumors, poisons, and injury, It is always best to locate the cause of head numbness to begin treatment as soon as possible. Neurological conditions that affect the nerves include: Lyme disease, which is a type of infection spread by ticks, Herpes Zoster, which is a painful reoccurrence of the chicken pox virus, Neuralgia from a post herpetic infection, which occurs several years after a herpes zoster infection, Multiple Sclerosis, an autoimmune disease which can affect the spinal cord, Trigeminal Neuralgia, or a chronic nerve disorder, Epilepsy, or a condition that affects the electrical activity of the brain, Tabes Dorsalis, a condition that results if a syphilis infection is not properly treated, and a condition referred to as Guillain-Barre syndrome, where the immune system attacks the nerves of the peripheral. Each of these neurological conditions requires the treatment of a medical professional.


Injuries to the head and neck region can damage nerves as well. These injuries may be mild or extremely severe. Any injury to the head and neck area should be checked by a doctor. Tumors located near the head and neck may also lead to feelings of numbness or tingling. This can occur if a tumor presses on a nerve, secretes a substance that damage the nerves, or if the tumor directly infiltrates the nerve. Any type of disorder that directly affects the spine, such as disc diseases and osteoporosis may also affect the nerves of the neck and head. Since the nerves are supplied by the circulatory system, any type of disorder that affects the circulatory system may lead to problems with numbness as well. This can include strokes, Angina pectoris, which is a blockage to the heart and circulatory disorders of the smaller arteries. Poisons can also cause damage to the nerve, as well as severe allergic reactions and improper use of medications.  Even mental disorders such as anxiety disorders can lead to tingling and numbness of the head. Metabolic disorders may also lead to tingling and numbness to many parts of the body, including the head.


Conclusion


Based on the vast amount of possible causes for head numbness and tingling, any patient experiencing these symptoms should report to a medical professional as soon as possible. Determining the direct cause may be difficult to accomplish, but may end up saving the patient’s life in the long run. Treatments for odd sensations in the head may be possible, or the patient may need to learn to live with them.


 

 

 

 


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